You Cannot Be Generally Advanced - Advanced Fitness Is Specific

Posted on 16 Dec 2014 01:29

I saw a fitness post the other day that said, "If there is no progress there is no health benefit." I replied that this is not necessarily true, but the author of the post decided not to engage me on the subject. The message that you must continue to progress in order to "be healthy" is erroneous. It is no surprise to me that the author did not choose to defend his assertion.

Also, as I began considering this article, I was reminded of a statement I read about older folks lifting weights in the gym. They were being seen to always lift the same weights, and this was seen as nonprogressive, and so to have no benefits. I thought I could fairly easily counter the view that exercise of any kind without progress does not mean there are no benefits. After all, I laid the groundwork for this here, in inventing the couch potato. I figured I could expand on some of the statements in that article, and put this myth to bed, in the journalistic parlance.

But then, I began considering the root of the problem. I couldn't settle on one root, but I quickly targeted a big one. One I would call a grandaddy. The greater fitness industry equates fitness with progressive exercise. And, it equates fitness with health. Then I had it. The question. Does fitness equal health?

hiking.jpg
hiking.jpg

We have to define fitness, of course. And we define it based on, in large part, intention, or overall effect. Often, fitness professionals define all fitness as "overall fitness," and this is what is considered to be general physical fitness. Unfortunately, due to trends and marketing in the fitness industry, and demand creation, physical fitness has been conflated with athletic or skill-related fitness, giving rise to many health myths, and unrealistic prescriptions.

Fitness is a component of overall health, not health itself. There are many other factors that determine a person's state of health, after all. Many fitness professionals, therefore, instead of focusing on greater skill-related fitness, try to develop programs related to health but also give counseling on other lifestyle aspects that may contribute to health. Not all of them, of course, are qualified to dispense advice of this kind.

Often, we hear the term "fitness and health." Since so much of fitness has become centered on ever-progressive skill-related fitness, the public has been led to believe that ever greater fitness in this regard equals to ever greater health. After all…"fitness and health."

In the following articles I will break down these components and consider them further. First, let's define these "types" of fitness a bit more specifically.

What is Health Related Fitness?

What Is Skill-Related Or Athletic Fitness?

This page created 16 Dec 2014 01:29
Last updated 07 Feb 2018 22:58

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