Supplements

Consuming Whey Protein and Poor Appetite in Strength Training

The video below goes very deep into the lore of whey protein, including the way it is perceived as a nutraceutical which should be "taken" instead of consumed. The case is made that whey is a food and not a medicine, and should and can be treated as such. Myths about the danger of whey and many other details are discussed, including warnings about consuming too many "liquid calories," the anabolic window of opportunity, and nutrient timing in general. Of special interest may be the discussion concerning strength trainees with poor appetites. How does whey fit in with this problem?

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What is Sweet Dairy Whey and Can I Use it as a Whey Protein Supplement?

There are some companies that sell "Sweet Dairy Whey Powder" in bulk to consumers. This is very cheap, by the pound, compared to the typical whey protein supplement powders most strength training or bodybuilding trainees buy, and the price of whey protein has gone way up in the last year or so. The price of sweet dairy whey powder ranges from 3 to 4 bucks a pound, but it's possible to get it as low as one dollar a pound, if you buy in bulk. These powders are not flavored, and, despite the word sweet, are not sweetened.

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Whey Protein Processing, Terms and Definitions: Countering the Misconceptions About Whey Protein Including 'Raw' Whey

By Eric Troy

There is so much obsession, confusion, and supplement company shenanigans concerning whey protein products, I thought that what everyone needed was a thorough overview of the whey manufacturing process. That is, the whey powder manufacturing process.

Supplement companies use our ignorance against us: our ignorance of what whey is, how it is processed, and what all the terms attached to it mean.

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Fish Oil: Just the Facts

If you have a few years under your belt, then you can still remember what I call the “Fat-Free 80’s.” Think back to a time when dietary fat was the enemy. Ah, yes… A time when fat-free products lined the outer shelves of the supermarket. A time when it was not a bad thing to get a box of Entemann’s cinnamon rolls, as long as they were the FAT-FREE cinnamon rolls. Health Valley made some positively disgusting fat-free cookies, along with a host of other fat-free products that tasted like sugary cardboard. And we can’t forget the 75% sugar weight gainer products, those were priceless. 1,000, 2000, 4,000 calories per serving, and all you had to do was mix about a cup of powder into your favourite drink. No worries though, these gainers were virtually fat-free! What we were led to believe was that fat-free products equated to fat-free physiques. Unfortunately, that was far from the truth.

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Food Label Zealots, Chemicals, Supplements, and Natural Food: Want Some Chlorophyll?

As a continuance of my assault on the misleading ideas about "natural" food, this is yet another follow-up to a series of blog posts where I discuss chemicals in foods and the concept of natural. In the last one I talked about the difference between chemicals as nutrients and chemicals as pharmacologic agents. I explained that some chemicals in food do have a physiological affect beyond their basic biological functions. Others, such as compounds in herbals used for medicinal purposes simply have no function as a "nutrient." All of these, though, have one thing in common and that is summed up by saying that "The poison OR the remedy is in the DOSE." This is important in helping us recognize the difference between nutrition information and alternative medicine information.

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Vitamin A and Beta Carotene: What, How, When, Why to Supplement

By Ken Adams, M.D.] and Scott E. Conard, M.D.

Vitamin A and the pre-vitamin, beta carotene are closely related supplements. There are definite benefits to the nutritional supplementation of both Vitamin A and beta carotene but there are also dangers to their supplementation. Many people do not realize that beta carotene is converted within our bodies to Vitamin A but supplementation of one in lieu of the other is not equivalent to the supplementation of both. There are also other members of the antioxidant carotene family include cryptoxanthine, alpha-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein, and lycopene, most of which do not convert into significant amounts of vitamin A. These will be discussed also in this article.

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Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamine) - When, How, and Why to Supplement

By Ken Adams, M.D. and Scott E. Conard, M.D.

Sources and Physiologic Functions

Sources

Liver, kidney, muscle meats, eggs, cheese, milk, and fish are excellent sources of vitamin B12. It is not found in plant foods or in yeast. Fermented foods such as soy sauce, tempeh, and miso, and fortified foods such as soymilk are also good sources of this vitamin.

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Thiamine (Vitamin B1) How, Why and When to Supplement

By Ken Adams, M.D.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) Sources and Physiologic Functions

Sources

Pork, whole grains, and legumes are the richest sources of thiamine. Outer layers of seeds are particularly rich in this vitamin.

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Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) When, How, and Why to Supplement

Poultry, fish, liver, and eggs are good sources of this vitamin; meat and milk contain lesser amounts. Pyridoxine in animal sources is 96% bioavailable. Vitamin B6 can be made by intestinal bacteria in healthy persons. Plant foods such as legumes, peanuts, potatoes, yeast, bananas, corn, cabbage, yams, prunes, watermelon, and avocados also contain this vitamin.

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Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Sources: Liver is an excellent source of riboflavin. Milk, cheese, egg whites, legumes, peanuts, fish, meats, broccoli, spinach, and fortified grains are good sources. The UV component of sunlight destroys Riboflavin. Hence, milk should be protected in opaque cartons from bright light during storage. Proteins, dextrins, and starch decrease the need for this vitamin.

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Niacin (Vitamin B3) When, How, and Why to Supplement

By Ken Adams, M.D. and Scott E. Conard, M.D.

Niacin (Vitamin B-3):

Sources and Physiologic Functions Sources: Niacin is found in unrefined and enriched grain and cereal, milk, and lean meats, especially liver. Yeast, poultry, salt water fish, nuts, legumes, coffee, tea, dairy products, and potatoes are good sources of Niacin.

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What Is Homeopathy?

By Merseyside Skeptics Society

The 10:23 Campaign

Contrary to popular belief, 'homeopathy' is not the same as herbal medicine. Homeopathy is based on three central tenets, unchanged since their invention by Samuel Hahnemann in 1796.

The Law of Similars

The law of similars states that whatever would cause your symptoms, will also cure those same symptoms. Thus, if you find yourself unable to sleep, taking caffeine will help; streaming eyes due to hayfever can be treated with onions, and so on. This so-called law was based upon nothing other than Hahnemann's own imagination. You don't need to have a medical degree to see the flawed reasoning in taking caffeine - a stimulant - to help you sleep; yet caffeine is, even today, prescribed by homeopaths (under the name 'coffea') as a treatment for insomnia.

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Study Shows One-Fifth of Internet-Available Ayurvedic Medicines Contain Toxic Metals

Ayurveda is a traditional medical system that originated in India. It aims to integrate and balance the body, mind, and spirit to help prevent illness and promote wellness. Potentially toxic metals sometimes are incorporated in traditional Ayurvedic medicines as part of rasa shastra—a practice which combines herbs with metals, minerals, and gems. While rasa shastra practitioners claim that such medicines are safe if properly prepared, concerns regarding safety from metal intoxication remain. In an NCCAM-funded study, researchers sought to determine how often Ayurvedic medicines sold on the Internet contain detectable levels of lead, mercury, and arsenic. They purchased products manufactured in both India and the United States and examined both rasa shastra and non-rasa shastra (herbal-only) medicines.

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