Is Exercise Underrated?

27 Feb 2017 03:09

A YouTube video from a Channel called 'What I've Learned' recently caught my eye. The video was titled "Why Exercise is Underrated." Immediately, I question the assumption of the title. Is exercise underrated? The video focused on the faulty marketing of the fitness industry, saying that it focused on the wrong messages. All the while, the tacit assumption of the title was never challenged. No effort was made to examine any available statistics related to exercise behaviors, whether it be exercise avoidance or favorable and unfavorable attitudes toward exercise. Should such statistics exist, I am sure the content of the video would have changed greatly….

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What Is Strength Training?

22 Feb 2015 20:20

Strength training is actually simpler than you thought. The majority of basic articles on strength training do not bother to define strength training at all. When it is defined, the word "strength" is used in the explanation. The most typical type of definition looks something like this: "Strength training is using resistance to build your physical (or muscular) strength."

Usually, however, explanations focus on the benefits of strength training: Strength training builds muscle, decreases injury risk, makes bones stronger, etc….

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Levator Scapulae Muscle: Location, Actions, and Trigger Points

29 Oct 2010 15:40

The levator scapulae is a muscle located on each side of the neck, situated posteriorly1. It is named for its action in elevating or "lifting" the scapula and the word levator is the latin word for "to lift". This muscle is like the over-worked back-stage prop guy of the neck. Always in the shadow of the large sternocleidomastoid and hardly ever getting a moments rest.

Along with the trapezius, the levator scapulae works to shrug the shoulders by its raising of the medial margin of the scapula. If the scapula are fixed the muscles assist in cervical extension and if used alone flex the neck laterally to one side….

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Masseter Muscle: Location, Actions, and Trigger Points

18 Oct 2010 15:27

The masseter is a jaw muscle that gets its name from the Greek work "to chew". It is the major muscle of mastication (chewing) of the human jaw and serves primarily to elevate the mandible (lower jaw) while the deep tissues help to protrude (protract) it forward. Although we rarely think of it, the mandible is the only bone of the skull that is actually moveable. The upper jaw is fixed. There is a lot of moving for the mandible to do, therefore, and the masseter is the primary worker. Located on each side of the face in the parotid1 region at the back of the jaw, these muscles are easily visible or palpable when you clench your jaw, as they contract strongly just in front of the lower ears.2

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Sternocleidomastoid Muscle: Location, Action and Trigger Points

17 Oct 2010 21:25

By Eric Troy, Ground Up Strength

The sternocleidomastoid (SCM) is a muscle of the neck so-named because it originates on the sternum (sterno) and the clavicle (cleido) and inserts on the mastoid process1 (mastoid) which is an easily located bony prominence behind the ear. The muscles pass diagonally across the front and side of the neck beginning at the top of the sternum and ending behind the ear. This two-sided muscle is large and ropy, making it the most prominent muscle visible at the front of the neck….

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Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome

26 May 2009 01:23

Tell any long-distance runner or cyclist about your stinging pain at the side of the knee or hip, and you will get a knowing sympathetic look. ITB (Iliotibial band) friction syndrome is one of the commonest complaints amongst runners, cyclists and intense court sports….

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Ectomorph, Hargainer, Hardcore: Drop The Labels

19 May 2009 14:55

Labels are for boxes. In the case of strength and conditioning they usually decorate our excuse box.

I have never heard a trainee pin a label on themselves when it wasn’t the preamble for an excuse of some kind. But labels are also multi-taskers. They can provide a sense of identity in a homogenized world or serve simply as a “credential”….

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How To Win An Argument: The Art of Fighting Without Fighting

08 May 2009 15:07

How do you win an argument?

Simple. Don't argue!…

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Fitness As A Goal Or Strength As A Goal: Fitness Writ Large

03 May 2009 23:47

You may have noticed this site is about strength training. I have a confession to make. I don't know how to give fitness advice. Because I cannot clearly conceptualize fitness. I can understand exercise for health. I cannot understand exercise for fitness unless "fitness" is another word for health. But it is not.

While I certainly care about the concept of "fitness" I don't believe that fitness is a defined goal in itself. Apparently many trainers do as I see all sorts of hybridized strength/cardio concepts supposedly designed to optimize your pursuit of "fitness"….

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Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

01 May 2009 13:19

Nerves and blood vessels travel from the neck to the upper limb through a series of three tunnels, known collectively as the thoracic outlet. (Picture 1)

The nerves and blood vessels pass through three triangular channels which make up the thoracic outlet: (A) the triangular space between the scalene muscles; (B) the costoclavicular space; and (C) a space beneath the pectoralis minor muscle….

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Plantar Fasciitis

29 Apr 2009 15:00

The plantar fascia provides support when the foot rises up on the toes during walking, running, or climbing. It supports the long arch of the foot. Plantar fasciitis is caused by strain of the plantar fascia. The injured tissue causes pain at the bottom of the foot when starting to walk or when standing still for a long period of time. It is one of the most common causes of foot pain in adults [1,2].Jumping, running, or prolonged standing often causes strain on the plantar fascia. The outcome is generally good, with approximately 80 percent of people having no pain within one year. Flat feet can be a predisposing cause for plantar fasciitis as can a high arched foot (pes cavus) [2]….

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Sciatica: Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

28 Apr 2009 20:39

Sciatica is a buttock pain radiating down the back of the thigh and leg and possibly into the calf or foot. Other characteristics of sciatica include varying degrees of weakness in the leg muscles and numbness and/or tingling that radiates down the leg. These symptoms occur because of compression and/or irritation of the sciatic nerve or nerve roots which are forming the sciatic nerve. The areas in the buttock and leg affected by this compression are the areas that the sciatic nerve supplies with messages for normal function. There are many other names for sciatica including lumbosacral radicular syndrome, radiating low back pain, nerve root pain, and nerve root entrapment….

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Myofascial Trigger Points and Trigger Point Therapy

28 Apr 2009 01:35

For centuries it has been afflicting man. It is intangible, mysterious and yet ubiquitous. Myofascial Trigger Points are the commonest cause of undiagnosed or misdiagnosed aches, pains and other puzzling symptoms. The daily clinical experience of thousands of physiotherapists, massage therapists and physicians verifies that most back and neck pain and headaches which are recurrent and stubborn are caused by trigger points or muscles knots….

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Wobble Boards, Bosu Balls, or Foam: What's The Difference?

18 Apr 2009 16:00

You've probably seen a wobble board before. They are these round discs with a ball or disc underneath them. Bosu balls are similar but they are more like a half swiss ball with a platform attached. Figure 3 below shows a boy jumping from bosu ball to bosu ball using the "ball" side. These can also be turned over on a hard surface so that the ball is a pivot. People use this method for pushups, for instance….

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How to do Deadlifts: Hips Too High, Too Low, or Just Right

17 Apr 2009 01:18

What is this thing with hip position in deadlifting? Why is it so hard for people to figure out where their hips should be without a qualified coach laying on hands and forcing them into the best position?…

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Snatch Grip Deadlifts

12 Apr 2009 00:24

The name snatch grip deadlift is actually somewhat of a misnomer. It would be more accurate to simply call them Wide Grip Deadlift to avoid confusion. The reason they are called snatch grip is that they employ the wide grip that many Olympic lifters (most) employ in the Snatch Lift. But a snatch is still a snatch regardless of what grip is employed….

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Kneeling Squat

09 Apr 2009 20:35

The videos below show a kneeling squat. You don't need a smith machine apparatus like in the second one and you probably don't need a lifting belt. First, read the explanations and cautions provided here….

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Split Squats, Lunges, and Single-Leg Squats (Pistols)

02 Apr 2009 17:32

Much confusion exists as to the difference between these movements especially owing to confusing terminology like 'stationary lunges'.

Let's keep it simple. The following video shows a basic Split Squat. Variations to change emphasis, increase range of motion, or progress in difficulty would be:…

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Cortisol

31 Mar 2009 14:36

Cortisol is the primary member of a family of glucocorticoids, and is considered the main catabolic hormone. Corticosterone is the other glucocorticoid, but is thought to be much less potent than cortisol (accounting for approximately 4-5% of total glucocorticoid activity). Cortisol is made and secreted from the adrenal cortex, via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with a small amount also derived from the conversion of cortisone….

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Nondisruptive Muscle Strain Injury

25 Mar 2009 14:50

Before I begin this little explanation I want to drop a bomb on you. The majority of injuries that occur in the weight-room are not "severe". They are relatively small and manageable strains. But they can LEAD to the severe injuries when managed improperly….

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Stretch Reflex with Passive/Static Stretching

19 Mar 2009 17:16

The stretch reflex, or myotatic reflex is a neural mechanism that responds to changes in muscle length (stretching) by attempting to resist the change in length. The changes in length are detected by proprioceptors called muscle spindles. Changes in muscle tension are detected by another important proprioceptor, the Golgi tendon organ (note: there may be other processes at work)….

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Lip Service: Superficial Terms in the Fitness Industry

19 Mar 2009 00:20

Words can be very powerful. But words themselves aren’t everything; it’s how you string them together. Their context.

Brian Grasso said in an article, “We are a term crazy industry”. Yes, and I’d go so far as to say we are a term OBSESSED industry. Terms sometimes become more important than the message, or lack thereof….

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Shoulder Injury Prevention 2

18 Mar 2009 15:29

In the first part of shoulder injury prevention, I wrote about certain stretches and mobilizations necessary for the shoulder girdle to function properly and get the appropriate scapulo-glenohumeral rhythm. This means that we need to get the humerus to function properly in the glenohumeral joint to help the scapulae glide efficiently and not tilt anteriorly (up and forward).

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Shoulder Injury Prevention - Dip Shrugs

17 Mar 2009 16:58

17 Mar 2009 16:45

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