Is Exercise Underrated?

27 Feb 2017 03:09

A YouTube video from a Channel called 'What I've Learned' recently caught my eye. The video was titled "Why Exercise is Underrated." Immediately, I question the assumption of the title. Is exercise underrated? The video focused on the faulty marketing of the fitness industry, saying that it focused on the wrong messages. All the while, the tacit assumption of the title was never challenged. No effort was made to examine any available statistics related to exercise behaviors, whether it be exercise avoidance or favorable and unfavorable attitudes toward exercise. Should such statistics exist, I am sure the content of the video would have changed greatly….

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What Is Strength Training?

22 Feb 2015 20:20

Strength training is actually simpler than you thought. The majority of basic articles on strength training do not bother to define strength training at all. When it is defined, the word "strength" is used in the explanation. The most typical type of definition looks something like this: "Strength training is using resistance to build your physical (or muscular) strength."

Usually, however, explanations focus on the benefits of strength training: Strength training builds muscle, decreases injury risk, makes bones stronger, etc….

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The Intrinsic Muscles of the Hand: Thenar, Hypothenar, Interossei and Lumbricals Muscles

21 Nov 2010 22:25

The muscles that move the hand are divided into two groups, the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles. The extrinsic muscles of the hand are the powerful flexor and extensor muscles of the forearm. These muscles originate outside the hand and insert within the hand. Since they are located and originate on the forearm outside the hand itself, they are called extrinsic which comes from the Latin word extrinsecus meaning "on the outside".

There are also small muscles located within the structure of the hand itself. Since these muscles both originate and insert within the hand, they are referred to as intrinsic muscles. The word intrinsic comes from the latin word intrinsecus. The intrinsic muscles of the hand can be further divided into four groups, the thenar, hypothenar, interossei (dorsal and palmar), and lumbrical muscles.[Bibliography item wheelesintrinsic not found.][Bibliography item behnke not found.]

The intrinsic muscles that control the thumb, unlike those of the fingers, are actually stronger than the extrinsic thumb muscles.
[Bibliography item magee not found.]…

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Temporalis Muscle: Location, Action and Trigger Points

17 Nov 2010 15:48

The temporalis muscle is a large, thin fan-shaped muscle located in the side of the skull above and in front of the ear. It is a muscle of mastication and its role is similar to the masseter, which is to elevate the mandible (lower jaw) and so close the mouth. Although the masseter is the more powerful muscle the temporalis is an important chewing muscle. It starts at the temporal bone of the skull but passes all the way down beneath zygomatic arch (cheek bone), attaching to the mandible, enabling it to assist the masseter in closing the jaw but also to retract the mandible….

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Trapezius Muscle: Location, Actions, and Trigger Points

10 Nov 2010 23:24

The trapezius is a three part (tripartite) muscle of the upper back extending from the base of the skull all the way to the lower thoracic spine and laterally from the clavicle to the entire length of the spine of the scapula. Together the two trapezii form a diamond or kite-shaped trapezoid from which the muscle derives its name….

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Muscle Cramps Part V

29 Jun 2009 00:21

In the last article we introduced you to Randy, our imaginary 70 kg average male runner, and we created some potential scenarios regarding his fluid and sodium losses and replacement. The biggest take home message was to listen to your body and to drink to thirst, as this has been shown again and again in the field and the lab to keep people from drinking either too little or too much. We have received tons of feedback and discussion, and as we stated in the comments to that post we are pleased that so many of you are participating in the discussion, sharing your stories, and asking relevant and insightful questions….

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Make Your Own Dip Belt

26 Jun 2009 13:05

I finally made my own Dip Belt today.

I bought a cheap ass leather weightlifting belt for $7 (this is Bombay after all).

I then proceeded to buy a 6 foot long chain from a hardware shop for $2….

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Muscle Cramps Part 4.5

26 Jun 2009 03:17

This is a pseudo-Part V of our series on Muscle Cramps - I was tempted to call it Part V, but it's a little bit of a departure from what we've been talking about. In our next article, which we will be calling Part V, we'll wrap up this really challenging series and try to summarize all of the comments and our articles into one concluding piece….

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Pterygoid Muscle and Jaw Pain

25 Jun 2009 22:32

Having a forward head posture puts a lot of strain on the muscles of your neck and jaw. Having a "forward head" means that your head (and often one or both shoulders, too) are in front of your body.

Where should your head be instead? Well, when you were a toddler, it was pretty much directly over your body and that's still where it should be. Due to habits, furniture, car seats, work and life, sometimes our head moves out in front of us. That causes a lot of symptoms and TMJ pain, or pain and difficulty moving your jaw, can be one of those symptoms….

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Theories and Fallacies of Muscle Cramps Part IV: An explanation of the evolution of science

21 Jun 2009 18:24

Over the past three articles, we've taken what has turned out to be a pretty intense look at muscle cramps. We began with a discussion of how muscle cramps were first attributed to a low serum electrolyte concentration, without any substantial evidence for this theory. We then moved on to show that, in fact, people who cramped have the SAME electrolyte concentrations and levels of dehydration as those who do not cramp - this is pretty strongly suggestive that cramping is not caused by either dehydration or electrolyte depletion. Then in Part III, we described a new model for muscle cramps, involving a 'malfunction' in the reflex control of muscles during fatigue….

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What is Rolfing?

21 Jun 2009 01:18

Rolfing, otherwise known as Structural Integration, is named after Dr. Ida P. Rolf. Structural Integration is the outcome of her work from the 1920's all the way up to her death in 1979 although most sources say it was "created" in the 1960's.

This method of manipulation, instead of focusing on the muscles, is aimed at the fascia, which is the protective layer of connective tissue which surrounds the muscles, bones, and organs….

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Theories and Fallacies of Muscle Cramps Part III: A Novel Theory for Exercise-associated Muscle Cramps

19 Jun 2009 20:51

This marks the the third part of our series on muscle cramps. It was going to be the final installment in this particular series, but we've received some excellent and thoughtful questions and comments on the issue, so have decided that we'll do a fourth article, just summarizing some of those key "sticking" points. It seems from the feedback that this issue - electrolytes and cramps - is one of the more contentious ones around. So in our FOURTH article of the series, we'll look back and try to tie up any loose ends and conceptual issues….

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Pistol Squats Progression

19 Jun 2009 19:11

I finally managed to nail one legged squats with zero heel elevation!!!

It's been three months and I have gradually moved from using a thick heel elevation to using a thinner one and now I am left with none….

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Theories and Fallacies of Muscle Cramps Part II: Electrolyte Depletion Model of Muscle Cramps

17 Jun 2009 19:58

In part one of this series on muscle cramps we tried to set the scene by providing some history in this area. At times it might seem like we are a bit heavy on the historical side, but as we mentioned in one of our comments to Part I, understanding the historical record is crucial as often it helps us understand why we think what we do—-and this affects one's interpretation of the science. In this article we will focus on the prevailing premise that dehydration and electrolyte disturbances cause muscle cramps….

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The House of Cards

17 Jun 2009 01:58

Very recently I came across someone, and more importantly their training, and it warrants some blog attention.

This whole mess stems from single's training, which I dare say I know a thing or two about, and volume. The gist of the discussion is that if you perform more than one, or two, singles you are headed down the road to over-training. This person went from one extreme end, over-training, to the other, barely getting a training effect, and after posting a few comments and opinions I realized it was over before it began….

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Theories and Fallacies of Muscle Cramps Part I

16 Jun 2009 17:41

This is a follow-on from our series of articles on Fluid Intake and Dehydration, and as we were preparing to write this series, we realized that there may actually be even more nonsense and blatant lies in the media than there were for dehydration!…

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Importance Of Progression in Strength Training

16 Jun 2009 11:50

In my opinion, progression is the key to strength training. There is no point in hammering away at an exercise without progressing on it. But this is not new knowledge. This is simply an observation – an observation made by many strength specialists and this has recently gained a lot of momentum with online mention. But, I want to highlight how each exercise you have adopted into your training should be treated – or can be treated, differently in terms of progression….

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Fluid Intake, Dehydration, And Exercise Part IV

15 Jun 2009 16:25

So far we investigated the history of fluid ingestion in Part I, demonstrated why it is the metabolic rate that predicts temperature in Part II, and weighed up the strengths and weaknesses of the lab-based and field studies in Part III. For Part IV we will look at the thirst mechanism and why waiting until you are thirsty is not "too late."…

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Is Your "Strength Training" Actually Strength Training:Part 1

14 Jun 2009 20:02

A big problem with strength training is that it has been introduced in places (read: forums) where the general membership doesn't have adequate exposure or adequate knowledge. And like alot of internet sources and sites, the ideas and principles have been twisted and convoluted into something that it really isn't. With the large proponents of the distortion coming from the uneducated 'experts'….

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Fluid Intake Dehydration And Exercise Part III

12 Jun 2009 16:25

Welcome back for Part III in this series on fluid intake and dehydration during exercise! Thus far we have examined a brief history of fluid replacement during endurance exercise in Article I, and in Article II we tried to explain how some of the lab research has perhaps been over-interpreted, and how that has lead to a false belief that ingesting fluid during exercise will keep you cool. In that article we reported the findings of earlier researchers who concluded the following:

* The core temperature is maintained at a higher level during exercise
* It is the metabolic rate (or in other words, how hard you are exercising) that predicts the core temperature…

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Fluid Intake Dehydration And Exercise Part II

11 Jun 2009 14:49

This is the second article in our series on fluid intake, dehydration and exercise. In the last article we looked at the history of fluid intake and how radically our beliefs on the subject had changed. Today we turn our attention to the evidence that has accompanied this shift, beginning with the contention that runners who become dehydrated are likely to develop heat stroke….

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Fluid Intake, Dehydration, and Exercise Part I

10 Jun 2009 13:59

The story begins, as most do, at the beginning…a look at the history of fluid intake and drinking during endurance exercise, which serves to illustrate an important point, one which will be covered again and again in this series…For this post, we acknowledge Professor Tim Noakes of UCT, the fluid pioneer whose lifelong pursuit of the truth in this area (and a lone battle for much of it) has thrown up the excellent quotes and anecdotes we use as we delve into the issue….

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Anderson Half Squat

07 Jun 2009 21:11

Any of you that have been following my Journal here (Strength Journal) will know that I recently included the infamous 4 squat workout into my routine. This delightful little routine consists of 4 exercises, each with 4 sets (5,4,3, and 2 reps respectively)….

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Hernias of the Abdominal Wall

31 May 2009 17:08

The human body is divided into various compartments such as the thorax (chest), abdomen, skull, etc. The word hernia is derived from the Latin word for "rupture," and occurs when an organ normally contained in one of these cavities protrudes through the lining of that cavity. The term hernia is therefore very broad, as hernias can occur almost anywhere in the body. For example, a protrusion of an intervertebral disk of the spine into the spinal canal is called a herniated or ruptured disk; a protrusion of brain tissue, usually because of a head injury, through a natural opening at the base of the skull (called the foramen occipitalis) is referred to as an Uncal hernia. However the vast majority of hernias involve the abdominal cavity and therefore this article will concentrate specifically on this type of hernia….

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Homemade Medicine Ball Videos

26 May 2009 14:50

Medicine Ball DIY

Here are some do-it-yourself videos showing how to make your own homemade medicine balls.

This works. I have made medicine balls using methods similar to these and I use them all the time.

These homemade balls, of course, will not bounce, which is a useful function of a medicine ball as well so if you want bouncy ones you will need to buy them. But no need to wait. If you have an old basketball or any other balls of various sizes lying around then it's fairly simple….

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