Pain


Can Shingles Cause Pain in the Shoulder Blades?

The term "shingles" refers to a condition caused by the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chicken pox disease. After a person has had the chicken pox, the virus remains dormant, residing in nerve cells. Later on, as a result of many different factors, the virus may reactivate and leave the nerve cell and this is what causes herpes zoster, or shingles.

Continue Reading » Can Shingles Cause Pain in the Shoulder Blades?


Idiopathic (Primary) Achalasia

Idiopathic achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder characterized by esophageal aperistalsis and abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation in response to deglutition. It is a rare disease with an annual incidence of approximately 1/100,000 and a prevalence rate of 1/10,000. The disease can occur at any age, with a similar rate in men and women, but is usually diagnosed between 25 and 60 years. It is characterized predominantly by dysphagia to solids and liquids, bland regurgitation, and chest pain. Weight loss (usually between 5 to 10 kg) is present in most but not in all patients. Heartburn occurs in 27%–42% of achalasia patients. Etiology is unknown. Some familial cases have been reported, but the rarity of familial occurrence does not support the hypothesis that genetic inheritance is a significant etiologic factor. Association of achalasia with viral infections and auto-antibodies against myenteric plexus has been reported, but the causal relationship remains unclear. The diagnosis is based on history of the disease, radiography (barium esophagogram), and esophageal motility testing (esophageal manometry). Endoscopic examination is important to rule out malignancy as the cause of achalasia. Treatment is strictly palliative. Current medical and surgical therapeutic options (pneumatic dilation, surgical myotomy, and pharmacologic agents) aimed at reducing the LES pressure and facilitating esophageal emptying by gravity and hydrostatic pressure of retained food and liquids. Although it cannot be permanently cured, excellent palliation is available in over 90% of patients.

Continue Reading » Idiopathic (Primary) Achalasia


What is Bursitis? Its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention

Bursitis involves inflammation or irritation of the bursa of a joint. The word bursitis comes from the word bursa and "itis" which means inflammation.

A bursa is a small, synovial fluid containing sac surrounded by a membrane. These sacs act as cushions for the joints. Located in areas that are subject to friction, as when a muscle or tendon is pulling around a corner or over a bone, their purpose is to cushion and lubricate the tissues.Bibliography item acr not found.,Bibliography item jhwhite not found.

Continue Reading » What is Bursitis? Its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention


Muscle Spasms, Handwriting Cramps, and Involuntary Movements: What is Dystonia?

Dystonia is a disorder of movement which causes muscle cramps, involuntary twisting actions, other repetitive movements or abnormal postures. These can be brought on by sustained muscle contractions or spasms and may be painful, affecting a single muscle or group of muscles. Dystonias can occur in the arms, legs, neck, face, or all over the body. Dystonias that affect specific area are called focal dystonias. These conditions affect over 300, 000 people in the U.S.

Continue Reading » Muscle Spasms, Handwriting Cramps, and Involuntary Movements: What is Dystonia?


Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Although sometimes associated with the elderly, iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS or ITBFS, for iliotibial band friction syndrome) commonly affects the thighs and knees of runners, cyclists, hikers, and weight lifters. Squats, in particular, may cause this often acutely painful injury, providing a good case for proper form and adequate warm-ups and cool-downs.

Continue Reading » Iliotibial Band Syndrome


Trigger Point Therapy

Many of the people that come to Massage Therapists and Bodyworkers are seeking someone to help them with muscular pain and chronic tension from Myofascial Trigger Points. They've heard that Trigger Point Therapy is a great way to naturally relieve their pain and restore function.

Continue Reading » Trigger Point Therapy


How To Tell the Difference Between Myofascial Trigger Points and Fibromyalgia Tender Points

The terms trigger points and tender points are often used interchangeably. However, they are two different things and it is very important to understand the difference, especially if one suffers from a condition known as Fibromyalgia Sydrome.

Continue Reading » How To Tell the Difference Between Myofascial Trigger Points and Fibromyalgia Tender Points


Page Tree Navigation

© 2019 by Eric Troy and Ground Up Strength. All Rights Reserved. Please contact for permissions.