Nutrition


Eat This, Not That! Site Cooking the Protein Numbers with Six Foods Compared to Eggs

People love big promises and big protein numbers. A great way to deliver this without outright lying is to use something I've discussed before, literally true but misleading claims. The website Eat This, Not That, which promises flat abs and more if you just eat the magical foods they profile, used misleading claims in an effective way with it's article Surprising High-Protein Foods For Weight Loss.

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I'm Lactose Intolerant, Can I Still Use Whey Protein?

Milk is one of the easiest way for bodybuilders and strength athletes (or athletes in general) to get protein. Other dairy products, such as the popular Greek yogurt, are great for protein as well. Those folks who are lactose intolerant may lament not having this resource. This leads to a common question: Whey comes from milk, so can I use it if I'm lactose intolerant?

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A Daily Serving Of Peanuts Could Protect You From Heart Disease, A New Study Says

Something as easy as including a daily serving of peanuts as part of a high-fat meal could protect you from cardiovascular disease, according to a study lead by Xiaran Liu, a graduate student in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at Penn State. “Previous studies have shown that individuals who consume peanuts more than two times a week have a lower risk of coronary heart disease,” said Liu. “This study indicates that the protective effect of peanut consumption could be due, in part, to its beneficial effect on artery health.”

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"Processed" Food Has Become A Dirty Word

By Gabrielle Maston

Did you know that everything in our food chain is processed? Harvesting crops, slaughtering livestock or catching and killing game or fish is the first step of processing.

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When it comes to Education About Food, We Are Full of It: Fear-Laden and Romanticized Messages Go Hand in Hand

On a blog called "Fooducate" which I have been aware of for some time, and which is chock-full of unreasonable fear messages about food, I came across an article by a dietician speaking out against food fear-mongering. This is sure to confuse the regular blog readers. Linked on the very same page was a short non-fact-filled article about mechanically separated meat or so called pink slime. This article seems to exist for no other reason that to induce fear. The comments, perhaps, are even more revealing than the lack of a consistent message in this blog.

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Most Diseases are Caused by Poor Nutrition - Food Quackery Myth Examined

As I've pointed out so many times in the past, much of today's "nutrition" advice is actually medical advice, but of a spurious nature. One of the main contentions of this type of advice is that most diseases, health conditions, or just symptoms are caused by a lack of proper nutrition. There are hundreds and hundreds of nutrition "experts," some of which have grown to celebrity status, that tell their audience that just about anything that ails them can be cured by eating a certain food, adhering to a certain diet, or taking a certain vitamin, mineral, or supplement.

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Consuming Whey Protein and Poor Appetite in Strength Training

The video below goes very deep into the lore of whey protein, including the way it is perceived as a nutraceutical which should be "taken" instead of consumed. The case is made that whey is a food and not a medicine, and should and can be treated as such. Myths about the danger of whey and many other details are discussed, including warnings about consuming too many "liquid calories," the anabolic window of opportunity, and nutrient timing in general. Of special interest may be the discussion concerning strength trainees with poor appetites. How does whey fit in with this problem?



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What is Sweet Dairy Whey and Can I Use it as a Whey Protein Supplement?

There are some companies that sell "Sweet Dairy Whey Powder" in bulk to consumers. This is very cheap, by the pound, compared to the typical whey protein supplement powders most strength training or bodybuilding trainees buy, and the price of whey protein has gone way up in the last year or so. The price of sweet dairy whey powder ranges from 3 to 4 bucks a pound, but it's possible to get it as low as one dollar a pound, if you buy in bulk. These powders are not flavored, and, despite the word sweet, are not sweetened.

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What Is Nutrient Density? What is a Nutrient Dense Food? Plus, What are Empty Calories?

This explanation of nutrient density and empty calories takes the form of a video presentation. The article contains the exact transcript of the video.



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Chelated Mineral

Chelated Mineral: A mineral that is chemically bound to another substance, which is usually an amino acid. Some examples are ferrous fumarate, chromium picolinate, and selenocysteine (chelated zinc). Chelated mineral supplements are often claimed to be better absorbed by the body since these forms are closer to how the minerals appear in the foods we eat. There is little direct evidence to support this claim. These minerals may be easier on the stomach, though.

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Calories from Lipids (Fats), Carbohydrate, and Protein

The term we use to describe the energy derived from foods is Calorie. In other words, the terms energy and Calorie, when applied to foods, are synonymous. One calorie is defined as the quantity of heat necessary to raise one kg (1 liter) of water 1°C. What we call a calorie, therefore, is actually a kilogram calorie or kilocalorie, which is abbreviated kcal. If a food contained 100 kcal, then the energy the food contained would increase the temperature of 100 liters of water by 1°C. A capital C is used here, in the word Calorie, to indicate the kilocalorie, since one calorie would actually be the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1°C. For more on the calorie, and its problems, see Calorie Confusion.

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