Neural Fatigue


Intensity Cycling and High Intensity Overtraining: Training to Fail Pt. 2

See part one in this series Training to Fail: The Failurists.

Intensity cycling is basically what it sounds like. Cycling intensity. Specifically it means dialing back intensity (literally weight on the bar) for a period of weeks and then building back up in set increments to your previous load in the hopes that this will enable additional load to be added to the bar in the weeks that follow.1

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Strength Training and Nutrition Dogma

Modern strength training has, in recent times, aligned itself with science more than ever in the past. Unfortunately the majority of the industry has no clear knowledge of the scientific process and in fact, doesn't really know what science is. Most strength trainers who use science tend to point to science as if it is a thing. However, although we use the word as if it means a concrete thing it is rather a practice or system of acquiring knowledge. When we ask "what's the science on this?" what we really should be asking is "what is the state of knowledge on this?".

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Theories and Fallacies of Muscle Cramps Part III: A Novel Theory for Exercise-associated Muscle Cramps

This marks the the third part of our series on muscle cramps. It was going to be the final installment in this particular series, but we've received some excellent and thoughtful questions and comments on the issue, so have decided that we'll do a fourth article, just summarizing some of those key "sticking" points. It seems from the feedback that this issue - electrolytes and cramps - is one of the more contentious ones around. So in our FOURTH article of the series, we'll look back and try to tie up any loose ends and conceptual issues.

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The Singles Scene - Your Guide to Single Rep Strength Training

Few people understand how to use near maximal strength training to get results. There exists a dichotomy in many trainees' minds between "maxing out" and "training" that results in needless volume gathering and a misunderstanding of how to use maximal intensities (above 90% max load) effectively.

As will become clear throughout the pages of GUS, with strength training intensity is job one. If you are completely new to strength training; intensity is simply the percentage of your maximal ability (one rep maximum) that you are working with. A one rep maximum is sometimes called FM for the maximum force you can muster.

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