Intensity




The Problem with Reactive Training

I would love to be able to just do what I do and let others do what they do. Problem is, what others do often requires me to patiently explain to a trainee why a certain thing is not appropriate and why I am not going to "coach" them on some program or other that they are convinced they should be doing for no other reason than it being very popular on the internet. If you're a trainer then you've been there and you know what I am talking about. Start a strength training forum and see how much worse it gets. What do you think of this? What do you think of that?

Continue Reading » The Problem with Reactive Training


Training to Fail Part 3: The Failure of Intensity Cycling

This post is a continuation of Training to Fail Part 2: Intensity Cycling and High Intensity Overtraining.

Part one of this post showed that it has been very difficult to elicit performance decrements using high intensity overtraining protocols and extreme protocols had to be undertaken to do it. Yet, high intensity in these studies meant MAXIMAL INTENSITIES. What's more these intensities were used over and over, rep after rep, for relatively long periods of time for such training.1 Intensity cycling is used for what is considered relatively high intensities as compared to hypertrophy parameters but nowhere near maximal intensities. The mean intensity of the so-called intermediate 5x5 programs is closer to 80% of maximum and sometimes lower.

Continue Reading » Training to Fail Part 3: The Failure of Intensity Cycling


Training to Fail Part 2: Intensity Cycling and High Intensity Overtraining

See part one in this series Training to Fail: The Failurists.

Intensity cycling is basically what it sounds like. Cycling intensity. Specifically it means dialing back intensity (literally weight on the bar) for a period of weeks and then building back up in set increments to your previous load in the hopes that this will enable additional load to be added to the bar in the weeks that follow.1

Continue Reading » Training to Fail Part 2: Intensity Cycling and High Intensity Overtraining


The Singles Scene - Your Guide to Single Rep Strength Training

Few people understand how to use near maximal strength training to get results. There exists a dichotomy in many trainees' minds between "maxing out" and "training" that results in needless volume gathering and a misunderstanding of how to use maximal intensities (above 90% max load) effectively.

As will become clear throughout the pages of GUS, with strength training intensity is job one. If you are completely new to strength training; intensity is simply the percentage of your maximal ability (one rep maximum) that you are working with. A one rep maximum is sometimes called FM for the maximum force you can muster.

Continue Reading » The Singles Scene - Your Guide to Single Rep Strength Training


© 2016 by Eric Troy and Ground Up Strength. All Rights Reserved. Please contact for permissions.