Amphiarthrodial Joints





Amphiarthrodial Joints: Also known as cartilaginous joints.

These are joints such as the intervertebral discs, sternebrae, sacro-iliac joints, pelvic symphyses, and mandibular symphyses.

Amphiarthrodial joints are only slightly movable with some being more movable than others, such as the intervertebral discs or symphysis pubis where the two pubic bones come together.

See also diarthrodial joints.

Cartilaginous joints are found in two types. In a symphyses, such as the intervertebral discs, the bones are connected by broad flattened fibrocartilage discs and in a synchondrosis the bones are connected by hyaline growth cartilage.

This cartilage directly unites one bone to another, hence the term "cartilaginous joint."

One good example of a amphiarthrodial or cartilaginous joints are the joints where the ribs join the sternum, by means of cartilage at the end of the ribs called costal cartilages.

For a great general reference see Structure and Function of the Musculoskeletal System by James Watkins

rib cage diagram showing where ribs joint sternum through costal cartilages, labelled

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This page created 03 Oct 2011 19:49
Last updated 20 Jul 2016 19:28

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