Food


Food Label Zealots Hate Chemicals Unless They're in a Supplement Bottle

As a continuance of my assault on the misleading ideas about "natural" food, this is yet another follow-up to a series of blog posts where I discuss chemicals in foods and the concept of natural. In the last one, I talked about the difference between chemicals as nutrients and chemicals as pharmacologic agents. I explained that some chemicals in food do have a physiological effect beyond their basic biological functions. Others, such as compounds in herbals used for medicinal purposes simply have no function as a "nutrient." All of these, though, have one thing in common and that is summed up by saying that "The poison OR the remedy is in the DOSE." This is important in helping us recognize the difference between nutrition information and alternative medicine information.

Continue Reading » Food Label Zealots Hate Chemicals Unless They're in a Supplement Bottle


Misconceptions About Nutrition Information Versus Alternative Medicine

Food Nutrients and Toxic Plant Compounds, All from the Same Food

In my post Homeopathy Is Not a Drug and Other Babbles I had quite a rant, albeit a very informative one, about some idiotic things a NaturalHealth.com article said about homeopathy and about homeopathy quackery in general. If you read that you will be more in flow with what is to follow. Cuz I'm not done!

Much of that post concerned chemicals. The food faddist or the homeopathic zealot, when he hears the word chemical, cries "POISON!" Yet, chemicals are what our food is made of and the term toxic chemical, taken by itself, is meaningless.

Continue Reading » Misconceptions About Nutrition Information Versus Alternative Medicine


Instinctual Eating, Thin People, and Appetite

By Eric Troy

Once in a post about Micheal Pollan's ideas about "nutritionism" and instinctual eating I made the following statement:

“…nutritionists would never tell you that simply eating by your “instincts” is a magical ticket to health.”

Continue Reading » Instinctual Eating, Thin People, and Appetite


Grass Fed Versus Grain Fed Beef: Fatty Acid Profiles, Antioxidant Content and Taste

Growing consumer interest in grass-fed beef products has raised a number of questions with regard to the perceived differences in nutritional quality between grass-fed and grain-fed cattle. Research spanning three decades suggests that grass-based diets can significantly improve the fatty acid (FA) composition and antioxidant content of beef, albeit with variable impacts on overall palatability.

Grass-based diets have been shown to enhance total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) (C18:2) isomers, trans vaccenic acid (TVA) (C18:1 t11), a precursor to CLA, and omega-3 (n-3) FAs on a g/g fat basis. While the overall concentration of total saturated fatty acids (SFA) is not different between feeding regimens, grass-finished beef tends toward a higher proportion of cholesterol neutral stearic FA (C18:0), and less cholesterol-elevating SFAs such as myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) fatty acids. Several studies suggest that grass-based diets elevate precursors for Vitamin A and E, as well as cancer fighting antioxidants such as glutathione (GT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as compared to grain-fed contemporaries. Fat conscious consumers will also prefer the overall lower fat content of a grass-fed beef product. However, consumers should be aware that the differences in FA content will also give grass-fed beef a distinct grass flavor and unique cooking qualities that should be considered when making the transition from grain-fed beef. In addition, the fat from grass-finished beef may have a yellowish appearance from the elevated carotenoid content (precursor to Vitamin A). It is also noted that grain-fed beef consumers may achieve similar intakes of both n-3 and CLA through the consumption of higher fat grain-fed portions.

Continue Reading » Grass Fed Versus Grain Fed Beef: Fatty Acid Profiles, Antioxidant Content and Taste


Greek Yogurt: Twice The Protein

Strength and bodybuilding trainees may have a new friend in the dairy industry. Well it's not new but it has only begun to be widely marketed in the US in the last few years. Greek Yogurt, introduced into the U.S. market in 2005. As of August, 2012 it has reached 30% of the U.S. refrigerated yogurt market.

Continue Reading » Greek Yogurt: Twice The Protein


© 2020 by Eric Troy and Ground Up Strength. All Rights Reserved. Please contact for permissions.