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The Shoulder Muscles - Deltoid, Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Major and Minor

by EricTEricT on 27 Oct 2015 19:17

The shoulder muscle videos and information in this article provide information about muscles of the shoulder girdle and of the shoulder joint. This distinction is frequently misunderstood. For more information of this subject see The Shoulder Complex: Demystifying the Shoulder with Eric Beard. Also see more information about particular muscles presented on this page. Deltoid Muscle and Its Trigger Points Teres Major and Its Trigger Points Infraspinatus Muscle and Its Trigger Points What follows are two videos giving a presentation of each muscle using an anatomical model, and then written information about the origin, insertions, and actions of each muscle discussed. Shoulder Muscles Video 1: Deltoid, Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Major and Minor Deltoid Muscle For indepth information on the deltoid muscle, including its origins, insertions, and actions, see link, as above. Supraspinatus Muscle Origin: medial two-thirds of suprispinatus fossa of scapula Insertion: greater tubercle of humerus Action: weak abduction of arm (initiates abduction) and stabilization of humeral head in glenoid fossa Infraspinatus Muscle Origin: medial two-thirds of infraspinatus fossa just...

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One Good Anatomy and Physiology Text - Books Trainers Need

by EricTEricT on 26 Oct 2015 16:16

I am a firm advocate of basic texts for everyone interested in learning about training, nutrition, physiology, exercise science, etc. So much confusion could be saved if the average trainer and trainee didn't get all his or her information from the popular press . Sure, popular press cannot be a good a place to find information, but people lack a firm foundation from which to think critically and assess the quality of the information presented. A thorough grounding from more scholarly sources can help tremendously, although this is not the only requirement! Although these are not the only books you need, two of the primary sources you should have are an anatomy text book and an exercise physiology text book. Now, not all textbooks should be considered to contain truth but you get a much more reliable distillation of knowledge from many of them. I think it is very difficult for most trainers and/or trainees to fork out money for books like these when they see books promising the moon with the latest new training methods. Once you begin to buy your textbooks, however, you will see that the amount of information you are getting for your money versus the promises' from other...

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Forearm Extensor Muscles - Origins, Insertions, and Actions, with Video Presentation

by EricTEricT on 25 Oct 2015 22:49

See also Forearm Flexor Muscles - Origins, Insertions, and Actions, with Video Presentation. The following is information on the extensor muscles of the forearms. These videos were produced to help students of human anatomy at Modesto Junior College study their anatomical models. They are done with models showing the muscular structure of the arm. The following two videos present an overview of the major flexor muscles of the forearm, which are the muscles of the posterior compartment. Each video is followed by information on the origin, insertion, and actions of each muscle covered in the video. Forearm - Extensors Muscles Part 1 Brachioradialis Origin: distal two-thirds of lateral condyloid ridge of humerus Insertion: distal end of radius at styloid process Action: flexion of elbow, pronation: supinated to neutral, supination: pronated to neutral Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis Origin: lateral epicondyle of humerus Insertion: base of third metacarpal Action extension of wrist, abduction of wrist, weak extension of elbow Extensor Carpi Radialus Longus Origin: lower third of lateral supracondylar ridge of humerus and epicondyle of humerus Insertion: base of second metacarpal...

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Forearm Flexor Muscles - Origins, Insertions, and Actions, with Video Presentation

by EricTEricT on 25 Oct 2015 22:12

These videos were produced to help students of human anatomy at Modesto Junior College study their anatomical models. They are done with models showing the muscular structure of the arm. The following two videos present an overview of the major flexor muscles of the forearm, which are the muscles of the anterior compartment. These muscles not only are responsible for flexion of the wrist, but are also the extrinsic muscles of the hand, responsible for much its gripping strength. Each video is followed by information on the origin, insertion, and actions of each muscle covered in the video. Forearm Flexor Muscles Video Part 1 Pronator Teres muscle Origin: humeral head: medial epicondyle of humerus (common flexor tendon), ulnar head: coronoid process of ulna Insertion: radius Action: pronation of forearm, flexion of elbow Flexor Carpi Radialis Origin: medial epicondyle of the humerus Insertion: Base of the second and third metacarpals, anterior palmar surface Action: Flexion of wrist, Abduction of Wrist, flexion of elbow (weak) Palmarus Longus Origin: medial epicondyle of the humerus Insertion: palmar aponneurosis of the second, third, fourth, and fifth...

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Curing The Buttwink During Squats

by EricTEricT on 25 Oct 2015 21:24

By Eric Troy This information originally appeared as a forum thread here on GUS. In an effort to preserve the most popular (or perhaps important) information, before shutting down the forum, it will not appear as an article, permanently. Regarding some questions about the infamous buttwink during the squat were posted on the Facebook page. I am going to answer them here as best I can. First things first, though: What is a 'Buttwink' Buttwink is a crude slang used to describe the problem of hips going into posterior tilt and the butt seeming to roll under the spine at the bottom of the squat exercise. This causes the lower spine to be in a supposedly vulnerable loaded position and causes getting out of the hole to be less than efficient. The biggest reason I am presenting this is because having a buttwink (or 'rollunder?') makes it tougher to get out of the hole, especially during very heavy squats. The idea that the buttwink is an automatic ticket to injury or pain in the sacroiliac region is not grounded in much direct evidence and having your hips roll under once in a while is not really a disaster. Curing the buttwink, however, will in the long run give you a much more...

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Does a Cool Down Period Help You Recover from Training?

by EricTEricT on 20 Oct 2015 17:22

Answer: It probably does, though of course it depends on the level and type of training. Today there is a big emphasis on training routines for general fitness that exhaust the participants. Many professionals have reacted to this trend by explaining that exercise for the purpose of exhaustion is silly and short-sighted. They have also pointed out that anybody can train another person to exhaustion, it takes no special skill! Yet, we see many photos of folks lying on the ground post-exercise, posted on Social Media as it were a badge of honor. CrossFit participants in particular love these types of pics. Here is what is odd to a professional trainer: While these people may emphasize a proper warm-up, they don't bother with a cool-down period at all. The importance of a proper warm-up for exercise is often discussed, but cool-down periods are hardly ever mentioned. They can, however, help you recover from exercise more quickly, and even make exercise safer. Cool-Downs May Help Clear Lactic Acid, Facilitate Venous Return from the Muscles, and Even Help with DOMS For example, if you've built up a lot of lactic acid in the muscles, it will be cleared a bit quicker if you cool down ...

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