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Glute Muscles: Origins, Insertions, and Actions w/ Videos

by EricTEricT on 28 Feb 2018 05:14

The videos and information in this article provide an overview of the muscles of gluteal region, commonly called the glutes. The first video covers the tensor fasciae latae, gluteus maxiumus, gluteus medius, gluteal minimus and piriformis muscles. The second video covers the obdurator internus, superior gemellus, inferior gemellus, and quadratus femoris muscles. Glute Muscle Video Part I Tensor Fasciae Latae Muscle Origin: Outer margin of the anterior iliac crest. Insertion: Iliotibial tract about one-fourth of the way down the thigh. Action: Flexion of hip, internal rotation of hip as it flexes. Gluteus Maximus Muscle Origin: Posterior one-fourth of iliac crest, posterior surface of sacrum and coccyx near ilium, and fascia of lumbar area. Insertion: Gluteal tuberosity of the femur (lateral surface of greater trochanter of femur) and iliotibial tract posterior aspect iliotibial tract Action: Extension of hip, external rotation of hip. Gluteus Medius Muscle Origin: Lateral surface of ilium just below crest. Insertion: Greater trochanter of the femur. Action: Abduction of the hip, external rotation of hip as the hip abducts, internal rotation of the hip. Gluteus Minimus...

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What is Myalgia? Video Presentation

by EricTEricT on 11 Feb 2017 22:41

Full Transcript of Help, I have Myalgia! In this video I want to talk about the word myalgia, because I've noticed, as of late, more questions and concerns over the condition of myalgia. So I thought it'd be a good idea to explain something about this condition because when I see people expressing general concern over their myalgia condition, I have to worry about the state of information overload on the net. Myalgia is just a fancy, scientific term for muscle pain. It can refer to any type of muscle pain, whether dull, sharp, piercing, etc. The my- part of the word comes from the root word myo which refers to muscle and the -algia suffix at the end means basically pain or a painful condition of. I suspect that the emergence of these concerns has to do with people writing articles about muscle pain and using this myalgia jargon to sound more scientific or legit. The article might just be about benign and normal pain, but when people see a word like myalgia, they are led to think of a serious pathological condition. Suddenly, they don't have sore muscles, they have myalgia. What do I do? How do I cure it? Well, you know, there are many, many conditions or pathologies that...

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Are Cleansing and Detox Diets Just Fancy Anorexia?

by EricTEricT on 25 Jul 2016 18:54

By Eric Troy I've seen a quote about cleanse diets and detoxing being shared on Facebook quite a lot lately. Each time it shows up, it gets hundreds to thousands of likes and hundreds of shares. Amazing the power of a superficially logical statement that is actually based on a fallacy. This is one I would call a false analogy. I decided I'd like to write a few things about it. First, the quote. It is by someone named Jessica Goldstein. I didn't know who she was or where the quote originated, but I tracked it down to a website called ThinkProgress, for which Jessica Goldstein is the culture editor and, obviously, a writer. Let's start with the quote, and then I'll get to the context of the quote: I have this theory that the reason cleansing and detoxing have taken off is because it’s this socially acceptable way to have an eating disorder, basically, for a finite period of time. No one would ever say, “Oh, you should definitely just not eat for the entire month before your wedding.” But you can say, “You should do this lemon and cayenne pepper cleanse, you’ll feel amazing,” and somehow that’s okay. But it’s just fancy anorexia. This quote is actually from an interview that...

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Thigh Muscles - Origins, Insertions, and Actions w/ Videos

by EricTEricT on 03 Mar 2016 21:16

The videos and information in this article provide an overview of the muscles of upper leg, which is known as the thigh. This first video presents the muscles of the front part or anterior compartment of the thigh. Quadriceps and Illiopsoas Muscles Anterior Thigh Muscles Video Sartorius Muscle Origin: Anterior superior iliac spine. Insertion: anterior medial condyle of tibia. Action: flexion of hip, flexion of knee, external rotation of thigh during, flexion of hip and knee Rectus Femoris Muscle The rectus femoris is the only two-joint quadriceps muscle which crosses the knee and hip joint thus being able to both extend the knee and flex the hip. Origin: anterior inferior iliac spine. Insertion: superior aspect of patella and patellar tendon to tibial tuberosity. Action: extension of knee, flexion of hip Vastus Lateralis Muscle Origin: intertrochanteric lin, anterior and inferior borders of greater trochanter, gluteal tuberosity, upper half of linea aspera and lateral intermuscular septum. Insertion: lateral border of patella and petellar tendon to tibial tuberosity. Action: extension of knee. Vastus Medialis Muscle Origin: entire length of linea aspera and medial...

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What is Bulletproof, Fitness Industry?

by EricTEricT on 09 Jan 2016 21:57

Sorry, fitness peeps, I'm not buying your bulletproof promises. I want a fitness expert, strength coach, or anyone who knows, to define the word bulletproof for me. I know we can define what bulletproof means in regards to actual physical bullets fired from a gun, but I want to know what it means in regards to fitness, strength training, or health. Go ahead, the comment field is below. I'll wait Wow, that was a long wait and I don't see any definitions forthcoming. Do you realize that I can say anything about fitness or strength training as long as I use words like bulletproof? It's just one of the latest in a huge shit-pile of meaningless terms that have become in-vogue in the fitness industry. You can have bulletproof abs, of course. You can have bulletproof coffee, probably the swill that got this ball rolling, although it was not the first use of the term. As well, you can have a bulletproof attitude, bulletproof training program, and a pair of bulletproof knickerbockers. You can even have a bulletproof brain. As for bulletproof coffee, I would bet you that many of the same fitness professionals who have talked about how stupid it is will have no problem jumping onto the...

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The Shoulder Muscles - Deltoid, Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Major and Minor

by EricTEricT on 27 Oct 2015 19:17

The shoulder muscle videos and information in this article provide information about muscles of the shoulder girdle and of the shoulder joint. This distinction is frequently misunderstood. For more information of this subject see The Shoulder Complex: Demystifying the Shoulder with Eric Beard. Also see more information about particular muscles presented on this page. Deltoid Muscle and Its Trigger Points Teres Major and Its Trigger Points Infraspinatus Muscle and Its Trigger Points What follows are two videos giving a presentation of each muscle using an anatomical model, and then written information about the origin, insertions, and actions of each muscle discussed. Shoulder Muscles Video 1: Deltoid, Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Major and Minor Deltoid Muscle For indepth information on the deltoid muscle, including its origins, insertions, and actions, see link, as above. Supraspinatus Muscle Origin: medial two-thirds of suprispinatus fossa of scapula Insertion: greater tubercle of humerus Action: weak abduction of arm (initiates abduction) and stabilization of humeral head in glenoid fossa Infraspinatus Muscle Origin: medial two-thirds of infraspinatus fossa just...

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One Good Anatomy and Physiology Text - Books Trainers Need

by EricTEricT on 26 Oct 2015 16:16

I am a firm advocate of basic texts for everyone interested in learning about training, nutrition, physiology, exercise science, etc. So much confusion could be saved if the average trainer and trainee didn't get all his or her information from the popular press . Sure, popular press cannot be a good a place to find information, but people lack a firm foundation from which to think critically and assess the quality of the information presented. A thorough grounding from more scholarly sources can help tremendously, although this is not the only requirement! Although these are not the only books you need, two of the primary sources you should have are an anatomy text book and an exercise physiology text book. Now, not all textbooks should be considered to contain truth but you get a much more reliable distillation of knowledge from many of them. I think it is very difficult for most trainers and/or trainees to fork out money for books like these when they see books promising the moon with the latest new training methods. Once you begin to buy your textbooks, however, you will see that the amount of information you are getting for your money versus the promises' from other...

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Forearm Extensor Muscles - Origins, Insertions, and Actions, with Video Presentation

by EricTEricT on 25 Oct 2015 22:49

See also Forearm Flexor Muscles - Origins, Insertions, and Actions, with Video Presentation. The following is information on the extensor muscles of the forearms. These videos were produced to help students of human anatomy at Modesto Junior College study their anatomical models. They are done with models showing the muscular structure of the arm. The following two videos present an overview of the major flexor muscles of the forearm, which are the muscles of the posterior compartment. Each video is followed by information on the origin, insertion, and actions of each muscle covered in the video. Forearm - Extensors Muscles Part 1 Brachioradialis Origin: distal two-thirds of lateral condyloid ridge of humerus Insertion: distal end of radius at styloid process Action: flexion of elbow, pronation: supinated to neutral, supination: pronated to neutral Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis Origin: lateral epicondyle of humerus Insertion: base of third metacarpal Action extension of wrist, abduction of wrist, weak extension of elbow Extensor Carpi Radialus Longus Origin: lower third of lateral supracondylar ridge of humerus and epicondyle of humerus Insertion: base of second metacarpal...

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Forearm Flexor Muscles - Origins, Insertions, and Actions, with Video Presentation

by EricTEricT on 25 Oct 2015 22:12

These videos were produced to help students of human anatomy at Modesto Junior College study their anatomical models. They are done with models showing the muscular structure of the arm. The following two videos present an overview of the major flexor muscles of the forearm, which are the muscles of the anterior compartment. These muscles not only are responsible for flexion of the wrist, but are also the extrinsic muscles of the hand, responsible for much its gripping strength. Each video is followed by information on the origin, insertion, and actions of each muscle covered in the video. Forearm Flexor Muscles Video Part 1 Pronator Teres muscle Origin: humeral head: medial epicondyle of humerus (common flexor tendon), ulnar head: coronoid process of ulna Insertion: radius Action: pronation of forearm, flexion of elbow Flexor Carpi Radialis Origin: medial epicondyle of the humerus Insertion: Base of the second and third metacarpals, anterior palmar surface Action: Flexion of wrist, Abduction of Wrist, flexion of elbow (weak) Palmarus Longus Origin: medial epicondyle of the humerus Insertion: palmar aponneurosis of the second, third, fourth, and fifth...

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Curing The Buttwink During Squats

by EricTEricT on 25 Oct 2015 21:24

By Eric Troy This information originally appeared as a forum thread here on GUS. In an effort to preserve the most popular (or perhaps important) information, before shutting down the forum, it will not appear as an article, permanently. Regarding some questions about the infamous buttwink during the squat were posted on the Facebook page. I am going to answer them here as best I can. First things first, though: What is a 'Buttwink' Buttwink is a crude slang used to describe the problem of hips going into posterior tilt and the butt seeming to roll under the spine at the bottom of the squat exercise. This causes the lower spine to be in a supposedly vulnerable loaded position and causes getting out of the hole to be less than efficient. The biggest reason I am presenting this is because having a buttwink (or 'rollunder?') makes it tougher to get out of the hole, especially during very heavy squats. The idea that the buttwink is an automatic ticket to injury or pain in the sacroiliac region is not grounded in much direct evidence and having your hips roll under once in a while is not really a disaster. Curing the buttwink, however, will in the long run give you a much more...

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