Fat Loss

The Truth About Fast Weight Loss

WEIGHT LOSS POP QUIZ: What are 3 things that ALL 8 of these advertisements have in common?

  • “Burn 30 lbs in 3 weeks - no diet!”
  • “Lose 9 Pounds Every 11 Days!”
  • “Lose a pound a day without diet or exercise!”
  • “Lose 2 pounds a day without dieting!”
  • “Lose 30 pounds In 30 Days!”
  • “Lose 20 lbs in 3 weeks!”
  • “Burn 30 lbs in 25 days!”
  • “Lose 10 Pounds This Weekend!”

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Effects of Exercise, Diet, and a Combination of Exercise and Diet in Overweight and Obese Adults

Abstract: The objective of the following meta-analysis was to determine what kind of treatment, or combination of treatments, has the greatest effect on weight loss in overweight and obese adults.

A systematic search was conducted of the available literature published between 1993 and 2006 that covered randomized controlled trials on overweight and obese subjects who underwent treatment consisting of physical exercise and/ or changes in diet. The scope of the search thus incorporated seven relevant databases. Using 6,545 key word combinations, the electronic search yielded a total of 36,869 abstracts. 13 relevant studies with a total of 826 subjects (BMI > 25; 17 - 68 years of age) met the meta-analysis criteria. The courses of treatment included “diet (d)”, “physical exercise (pe)”, “diet and physical exercise (dpe)”, and “no intervention (ni)”. The results confirmed the hypothesis that the combined intervention “dpe” had the greatest effect with regard to weight loss. The single treatments “pe” and “d” also led to weight loss, with “d” having a significantly greater effect than “pe”. The main reason for the small sample size of thirteen studies out of 36,819 was that the experimental design and/or procedures of most studies were inadequate. A common error was a failure to assign subjects randomly to the different treatment groups. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that a combination of diet and physical exercise is the best form of treatment to induce weight loss in overweight individuals in the first weeks, followed by physical exercise to maintain weight loss.

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Changes in Intakes of Total and Added Sugar and their Contribution to Energy Intake in the U.S.

Sugars are a ubiquitous component of our food supply. They are consumed as a naturally occurring component of our diet and as additions to foods during processing, preparation, or at the table. A healthy diet contains at least some amount of naturally occurring sugars, because monosaccharides, such as glucose and fructose, and disaccharides, such as sucrose and lactose, are integral components of fruit, vegetables, dairy products, and many grains [1]. Sugars also add desirable sensory effects and promote enjoyment of foods. Over the years, however, sugar intake has been claimed to be associated with several diet-related chronic diseases: diabetes, CVD, obesity, dental caries, and hyperactivity in children [2,3]. One of overwhelming concerns regarding sugars is the potential for excess energy intake from sugars resulting in weight gain and displacement of more nutrient-dense foods [2]. However, little attention has been given to the contribution of sugar and carbohydrates to total energy intake.

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Effect of Point-of-Purchase Calorie Labeling on Restaurant and Cafeteria Food Choices: A Literature Review

Eating away from home has increased in prevalence among US adults and now comprises about 50% of food expenditures. Calorie labeling on chain restaurant menus is one specific policy that has been proposed to help consumers make better food choices at restaurants. The present review evaluates the available empirical literature on the effects of calorie information on food choices in restaurant and cafeteria settings.

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Portion Size: Effect on Food Intake and Possible Interventions

The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased. A strong environmental factor contributing to the obesity epidemic is food portion size. This review of studies into the effects of portion size on energy intake shows that increased food portion sizes lead to increased energy intake levels. Important mechanisms explaining why larger portions are attractive and lead to higher intake levels are value for money and portion distortion. This review also shows that few intervention studies aiming to reverse the negative influence of portion size have been conducted thus far, and the ones that have been conducted show mixed effects. More intervention studies targeted at portion size are urgently needed. Opportunities for further interventions are identified and a framework for portion size interventions is proposed. Opportunities for intervention include those targeted at the individual as well as those targeted at the physical, economic, political and socio-cultural environment.

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Self Control: Not all its Cracked Up To Be

More and more, everyone is learning that "diets" don't work. Sure, people drop weight on diets but they fail to make a lasting change. I don't need to go into this, you know all about yo-yo dieting. Despite this there are still plenty of judgmental folks (who probably wouldn't know a problem if it bit them in the tuchus) who will say stuff like, "jeez, what ever happened to old fashioned self-control?"

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When Snacks Become Meals: How Hunger and Environmental Cues Bias Food Intake

While environmental and situational cues influence food intake, it is not always clear how they do so. We examine whether participants consume more when an eating occasion is associated with meal cues than with snack cues. We expect their perception of the type of eating occasion to mediate the amount of food they eat. In addition, we expect the effect of those cues on food intake to be strongest among those who are hungry.

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Hunger is a Physical Feeling

In my post, Instinctual Eating, Thin People, and Appetite, I discussed eating from the perspective of one life-long thin person.

My problem is not, therefore, keeping off fat but eating enough to maintain my strength and of course to continually get stronger. For a person like me that is not so easy to do and involves what seems like a lot of eating. Back when I was still suffering from the bodybuilding affliction it was even worse.

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Instinctual Eating, Thin People, and Appetite

By Eric Troy

Once in a post about Micheal Pollan's ideas about "nutritionism" and instinctual eating I made the following statement:

“…nutritionists would never tell you that simply eating by your “instincts” is a magical ticket to health.”

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Nutrition is Not a True or False Proposition

I just came across a "nutrition quiz".

I got eight out of ten correct. Only eight? ME? You have got to be kidding me? I am a nutrition stud. Well, perhaps not exactly a nutrition stud but let's just say I do not get my nutrition information from steroid salesmen on bodybuilding forums.

One of the questions on the quiz involved brown rice. Go figure. I knew they wanted to hear that brown rice was healthier than white rice so that is what I answered but really I refuse to capitulate to the nonsense about brown rice being magical health pellets and white rice being evil little starch monsters.

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