Fat Loss

Toxic Hunger? Toxic Clickbait is More Like It!

I am very happy to be bringing you this guest post by Dave Hargreaves, a fantastic personal trainer operating out of Melbourne, Australia, who specializes in Flexible Dieting with an interest in the avoidance of relapse for those in recovery from, or susceptible to eating disorders. His current and past clients include marathon runners, triathletes, powerlifters and others with general fitness and body conditioning goals. Dave has an infectious passion for the truth, and absolutely no tolerance for the pseudo-scientific and often harmful claims and prescriptions that plague the fitness and health industry. He goes after nonsense, and those who perpetuate it, with a fierceness and complete lack of pretension that is not often seen in this industry. Here, he rebuts an article from T-Nation, and its fantastical and baseless claims concerning 'toxic hunger.'

By Dave Hargreaves

Last week the T-Nation website ran an article on nutrition, which included some highly dubious claims about what happens when you choose “the wrong foods,” according to a new theory apparently coming out of the nutrition community.

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Skinny Bitch: A No-Nonsense, Tough-Love Guide for Savvy Girls Book Review: Eat, Read, Crap

The blurb for Skinny Bitch: A No-Nonsense, Tough-Love Guide for Savvy Girls Who Want to Stop Eating Crap and Start Looking Fabulous! claims that it is not your typical boring diet book. This is true. It also claims it is a tart-tongue no-holds barred wake-up call to all women who want to be thin. If calling your reader "shithead" is tart-tongued, I'll agree with this as well. You could also describe the language, instead of tart-tongued, as adolescent.

Continue Reading » Skinny Bitch: A No-Nonsense, Tough-Love Guide for Savvy Girls Book Review: Eat, Read, Crap


Is Strength Training the Key to Fatloss?

Fatloss is the biggest source of misconceptions concerning strength training. And the number one misconception and false statement made about strength training in regards to fat loss is that strength training is the key to fatloss. Fatloss and strength training bloggers alike get droves of people to their sites by telling them what the KEY to fatloss is. But strength training is not it.

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Acarbose Improperly Used for Weight Loss

Acarbose is one of a group of oligosaccharides (complex carbohydrates) which inhibit enzymes of starch and disaccharide digestion. It was introduced in 1990 by Bayer AG, Germany under the trade name Glucobay. In the U.S. it is marketed under the name Precose. Other trade names are Glumida and Prandose. It is also available in generic.

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Calories from Lipids (Fats), Carbohydrate, and Protein

The term we use to describe the energy derived from foods is Calorie. In other words, the terms energy and Calorie, when applied to foods, are synonymous. One calorie is defined as the quantity of heat necessary to raise one kg (1 liter) of water 1°C. What we call a calorie, therefore, is actually a kilogram calorie or kilocalorie, which is abbreviated kcal. If a food contained 100 kcal, then the energy the food contained would increase the temperature of 100 liters of water by 1°C. A capital C is used here, in the word Calorie, to indicate the kilocalorie, since one calorie would actually be the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1°C. For more on the calorie, and its problems, see Calorie Confusion.

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The Magical Farce of Negative Calories, The Thermic Effect, and Resting Energy Expenditure

Turning over a new leaf, just for this post, at least, I decided to actually write about fat loss. People who read my articles regularly know that I do not hand out weight loss advice. But a fun subject, and one a knowledgeable feller like myself can tackle, is the "negative calorie" claim that has surfaced through the years. The thing about this claim is that it can seem logical at first glance, to someone with no in-depth knowledge of nutrition, and at the heart of it, there is a kernel of truth. For those without knowledge and those who wish to cash in on that market, a kernel of truth is all that is needed.

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Anorexia Nervosa: Explanation, Signs, and Symptoms

The term anorexia nervosa comes from the Greek word for "lack of appetite" and a Latin word implying a nervous origin. It is a major emotional eating disorder and is characterized by three main criteria:

  • Significant self-induced starvation, or near-starvation
  • An extreme desire for thinness or being extremely afraid of becoming fat
  • The presence of medical signs and symptoms resulting from starvation

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From Portion Distortion to Mindful Eating

Portion sizes have increased dramatically over the last few decades, requiring us to be proactive in our effort to eat moderately. Traditional approaches to “portion control” such as weighing and measuring food are often ineffective for the long term because they are require too much time and energy and they are disconnected from our body’s needs.

A simpler and more practical approach to eating moderate portions is to use your innate hunger and fullness signals as your guide. Despite the super-sized servings we often encounter, we can create a habit of eating to the point of “just right” rather than “I can’t believe I ate the whole thing!” When the focus is on feeling good rather than being good, common sense will prevail.

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Inventing the Couch Potato: An Exercise Myth That Needs to Go Away

I've talked about the athlete fallacy many times. This fallacy is related to exercise guilt and the feeling that if you are not "going all the way" you are doing something wrong, wasting your time, may as well not bother, etc. and so on.

Also related to this idea, intrinsic to it really, is the idea that you must regularly go to the gym and engage in an exercise program or training plan in order to derive any health benefits from exercise. So, in other words, it takes a few weeks to a month to see any true benefit because that benefit is always from the cumulative results of regular exercise.

Continue Reading » Inventing the Couch Potato: An Exercise Myth That Needs to Go Away


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