Exercises

22 Oct 2009 17:43

One Legged Deadlift? What is That? And What Does it Do for your Strength Training?

by EricTEricT 06 Apr 2012 19:52

I am seeing enough one legged deadlifts or "single leg deadlifts" that I am compelled to make a point about how something becomes a deadlift. For something to become a deadlift, you must lift if from a "dead stop" off the floor. Why off the floor? Because if you only say "dead stop" as a way of categorizing a lift you end up in a goofy world where exercises in which the bar "stops" can be called a deadlift. A deadlift is not a category of lifts…it is simply one lift with some variations that are similar but not technically "deadlifts."

06 Apr 2012 19:52

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Bench Press: Flaring your elbows out versus tucking them to your sides. Plus, why you lift less on incline press.

by EricTEricT 25 Mar 2012 20:34

I recently got a bench press question form a member. You know it's funny, I used to get more bench press questions than anything and after a while, I started getting more deadlift questions than anything. Which I liked until I almost have grown sick of talking about the deadlift so it's sort of a treat to get a bench press question again. The question was basically this:

25 Mar 2012 20:34

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Deadlifts and Muscle Mass: Myths that Sell

by EricTEricT 11 Feb 2012 19:20

Somebody recently implied that I try to sell pure strength training to everybody. The idea being, I suppose, that I want to convince everybody to engage in maximum strength training and think it is "bad" if they don't, or, by extension, fail to follow my advice. Well, those who have read my blog extensively, of course, know better, since the "selling of strength" training is something I adamantly oppose and often complain about.

11 Feb 2012 19:20

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Difficulty Breathing During Front Squats: A Simple Training Drill to Solve the Problem

by EricTEricT 01 Feb 2012 23:02

You may have noticed that it can be difficult to get a good deep breath in between reps of the front squat. Not everybody has this problem to the same extent, but most everybody would have noticed that the front squat makes breathing a bit restricted. The position of the elbows, combined with the heavy load on the shoulders, restricts the chest. It is easy to simulate this effect right now as you read this: simply raise your arms up over your head and try to take a deep breath into your upper chest. You should notice that the chest wall is restricted and it is close to impossible to take a full breath this way.

01 Feb 2012 23:02

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How to Deadlift with Standard Plates

by EricTEricT 06 Apr 2010 01:47

You want to deadlift using standard plates but the small plates mean the bar is too low to the floor. What do you do? You simply place the weights on blocks to bring the bar up to a more standard deadlift height which is one that matches where the bar would be with Olympic plates.

06 Apr 2010 01:47

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BASIC Progression and Bulgarian Split Squats

by EricTEricT 06 Sep 2009 17:53

I am always bringing up, obsessively you might say, how there are many different ways to progress in strength training. And, in fact, how many different things we do and achieve represent progression that we don't even recognize.

06 Sep 2009 17:53

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Clean Style Deadlift versus Powerlifting Deadlift

by EricTEricT 06 Sep 2009 04:16

What is the difference between a clean style and powerlifting style deadlift?

There is no such distinction. There never was. I am sure that many powerlifters think that they have a style of deadlifting that should be called a "powerlifting style deadlift" but the deadlift is not a derivative of the clean and jerk and there is no style that distinguishes such.

06 Sep 2009 04:16

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This page created 22 Oct 2009 17:43
Last updated 10 Apr 2012 03:15

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