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Fitness and Strength Training: It's A Process

11 Jan 2011 17:29

I am in the process of transferring some old posts from the old "GUStrength's Blog" to here. This post was written in August 2009 and like many of the posts over there was never really seen. I think it is a good one and worth having more visibility, but I'll let you be the judge. It concerns a subject that we often discuss here at GUS, which comes down to the question of being a "task oriented" or "outcome oriented" person. This has been mentioned in numerous forum discussions and articles, so we must think it is a fairly important distinction. Here, I am trying to clear up just why that is.

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Get over the Time Magazine Article, Seriously

10 Jan 2011 15:46

This is an old post of my reaction to the infamous 2009 Time Magazine Article, "Why Exercise Won't Make You Thin". Even though this has been blogged on by so many others and it is old news I wanted to re-post with a little rewrite because 1) my reaction was quite different than the reaction of the "fitness industry" at large, 2) I think the general reaction says more about the fitness industry than it does about fat loss and 3) it is a good example of the type of disordered priorities that is prevalent in the fat loss world.

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Asinine Expectations in Strength Training

10 Jan 2011 15:00

I have noticed something curious in the strength training world and in the fitness world at large. Strength training and fitness professionals need to be less "me" oriented and the public needs to be less "other" oriented.

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Case Studies Versus Anecdotal Evidence in Strength Training and Bodybuilding

26 Dec 2010 21:32

Scenario: Guy comes on to a bodybuilding board and posts a thread about how such and such a supplement or program put 20 pounds on him in a month and grew two inches on his arms. Ignoring the obvious conclusion that the guy is bullshitting, the board members hit him with one of the following answers: "Anecdotal Evidence. Doesn't prove Anything." Or, "Case study of one. Doesn't prove anything."

Supposing it is 'evidence' of any kind which is it? Anecdotal evidence or a case study? It's anecdotal evidence. Guys coming on to bodybuilding boards talking about their new guns don't do case studies.

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The Rudy Effect: How Fitness Goals are Really Reached

30 Nov 2010 14:46

Sometimes I get myself so busy with writing about how to strength train, getting all down and dirty with the technical stuff, that I forget something very important. The same thing with dispensing advice.

You see, something that I sometimes forget but that is always in the back of my brain is a sad fact: The majority of people who find my articles or ask my advice will not be training a year from now. Or even a few months from now. In fact, it is quite likely that one of my articles is the first and last thing they will ever read about strength training or any other kind of "fitness pursuit". And the same is true of anyone who does what I do.

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Selling Strength Training and Making Waves in Fitness

09 Oct 2010 18:30

Dogma Revisited and the Price of Conformity

Dare to be different. Why? You'll go viral, that's why. The world is awash in a sea of conformity. The internet even more so. Anybody who says something contrary to the mainstream will stand out. Regardless of the real value of his or her message. This creates a marketing potential for any idea that is primarily conceived to simply differ from that which is considered mainstream or dogma. I actually received a newsletter about an article that introduced the article by saying this:

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Dietary Supplement Ripoffs to Avoid: Amino Acid Pills

07 Oct 2010 17:09

There is no long-term advantage for the strength trainee to taking expensive free form amino acid powders over simply ingesting whole proteins. However, if you do buy an amino acid powder (which I don't suggest) you expect it to contain single free form aminos acids, right?

Never trust the front label. Check the ingredients. The supplement ripoffs I am referring to are so-called amino acid capsules that actually contain overpriced whey or casein protein. Not free form single aminos but whole proteins compressed into a pill or put in a capsule. They will typically list an amino acid profile very prominently on the back of the label. This profile is nothing more than the typical amino acid yields of the whey or casein sources they use. When whey is used it is usually a mixture of whey protein concentrate or a mixture of concentrate and even cheaper non concentrated whey. Some may contain concentrates and isolates.

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