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Case Studies Versus Anecdotal Evidence in Strength Training and Bodybuilding

26 Dec 2010 21:32

Scenario: Guy comes on to a bodybuilding board and posts a thread about how such and such a supplement or program put 20 pounds on him in a month and grew two inches on his arms. Ignoring the obvious conclusion that the guy is bullshitting, the board members hit him with one of the following answers: "Anecdotal Evidence. Doesn't prove Anything." Or, "Case study of one. Doesn't prove anything."

Supposing it is 'evidence' of any kind which is it? Anecdotal evidence or a case study? It's anecdotal evidence. Guys coming on to bodybuilding boards talking about their new guns don't do case studies.

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The Rudy Effect: How Goals are Really Reached

30 Nov 2010 14:46

Sometimes I get myself so busy with writing about how to strength train, getting all down and dirty with the technical stuff, that I forget something very important. The same thing with dispensing advice.

You see, something that I sometimes forget but that is always in the back of my brain is a sad fact: The majority of people who find my articles or ask my advice will not be training a year from now. Or even a few months from now. In fact, it is quite likely that one of my articles is the first and last thing they will ever read about strength training or any other kind of "fitness pursuit". And the same is true of anyone who does what I do.

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Dogma Revisited and the Price of Conformity - The Selling of Strength Training

09 Oct 2010 18:30

Dare to be different. Why? You'll go viral, that's why. The world is awash in a sea of conformity. The internet even more so. Anybody who says something contrary to the mainstream will stand out. Regardless of the real value of his or her message. This creates a marketing potential for any idea that is primarily conceived to simply differ from that which is considered mainstream or dogma. I actually received a newsletter about an article that introduced the article by saying this:

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Dietary Supplement Ripoffs to Avoid: Amino Acid Pills

07 Oct 2010 17:09

There is no long-term advantage for the strength trainee to taking expensive free form amino acid powders over simply ingesting whole proteins. However, if you do buy an amino acid powder (which I don't suggest) you expect it to contain single free form aminos acids, right?

Never trust the front label. Check the ingredients. The supplement rippoffs I am referring to are so-called amino acid capsules that actually contain overpriced whey or casein protein. Not free form single aminos but whole proteins compressed into a pill or put in a capsule. They will typically list an amino acid profile very prominently on the back of the label. This profile is nothing more than the typical amino acid yields of the whey or casein sources they use. When whey is used it is usually a mixture of whey protein concentrate or a mixture of concentrate and even cheaper non concentrated whey. Some may contain concentrates and isolates.

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Comments: 7


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