Ergogenics


Ergolytic Agents: Substances and Other Agents that Impair Performance

Ergolytic is the opposite of ergogenic. It is derived from the Greek word ergon, meaning "work" and -lytic, which is the adjective form of the Greek word lysos, meaning "loosing, dissolving, or dissolution." The term ergolytic is used to refer to an agent, device, or factor that impairs athletic performance rather than enhances it. This impairment can be the result of physiological or psychological factors. Some common ergolytic agents are alcohol, tobacco (including smokeless), and marijuana.

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Soda Loading (Bicarbonate Loading, Buffer Boosting) for High Intensity Anaerobic Endurance

During high intensity anaerobic events, the muscles fatigue and energy supply is compromised because of the buildup of lactic acid from glycolysis. Athletes in high intensity events that last 2 to 10 minutes, such as a 400 to 800 or 1500 meter running races or middle distance swimming races sometimes use soda loading in an attempt to neutralize the lactic acid that accumulates in the blood. Depending on interpretation of the research, some experts suggest that the benefit is limited to events of 1 to 7 minute duration. Soda loading is also called buffer boosting or bicarbonate loading. It is also called, more rarely, soda doping or simply acid buffering.

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Peformance Enhancing Drugs Other Than Anabolic Steroids Used in Sports

Although most people, when they think of "performance enhancing drugs," only think of anabolic steroids, there is actually a large array of drugs that are used to enhance various aspects of performance. Some basic categories of drugs that are used in this way, including steroids, are stimulants, beta blockers, beta-2 agonists, diuretics, narcotic analgesics, and the oxygen increasing drug epoetin.

Since all such drugs are meant to be prescribed and used for specific medical conditions, using them as ergogenic aids can be very dangerous and such use should be considered abuse. This is especially true since athletes often take drugs in doses that far exceed normal therapeutic doses, and side effects, in some drugs, can occur even at normal levels. The side effects of a drug may also depend on the person's metabolism and whether other drugs are used at the same time. The following is a list of categories of performance enhancing drugs, their intended effect on performance, and their potential side-effects, starting with a brief review of anabolic steroids.

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What Are Herbs Really Good For? Catnip and Fennel

I recently published some very informative articles on ergogenic dietary supplements by Melvin Williams. Or at least "supposedly" ergogenic dietary supplements. Obviously, while many supplements may have health benefits, some are more ergogenic than others.

As you may recall, an ergogenic is anything that can help us do work or increase our capacity to do work. In other words improve our performance.

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Vitamins and Sports Performance

Sports success is dependent primarily on genetic endowment in athletes with morphologic, psychologic, physiologic and metabolic traits specific to performance characteristics vital to their sport. Such genetically-endowed athletes must also receive optimal training to increase physical power, enhance mental strength, and provide a mechanical advantage. However, athletes often attempt to go beyond training and use substances and techniques, often referred to as ergogenics[[footnote]]Ergogenic aids are any external influences that can be determined to enhance performance. These include mechanical aids, pharmacological aids, physiological aids, nutritional aids, and psychological aids.

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